CURBSIDE SERVICE ONLY – NEW COVID-19 Protocol

Red Lodge Veterinary Clinic’s – New COVID-19 Curbside/Carside Service Protocol

Red Lodge Veterinary Clinic is closely monitoring the COVID-19 situation throughout our state, country and worldwide. In order to reduce the number of people entering our hospital, we have decided to only allow patients, and employees into our facility. This will reduce exposure to our clients, staff and facility. We really appreciate everyone’s help with social distancing. We are still offering ALL of our regular services, and look forward to assisting you.

 

Small Animal Visits

What to expect:

Please stay in your vehicle and call us at the office, (406) 446-2815, when you arrive to the clinic. We will come out to your vehicle and bring your pet in for their examination and treatments. Dr. Casey Gruber will discuss the exam findings and treatment options (if applicable) by phone. Once we are done, we can collect carside/curbside payment at that time, or can process payment over the phone. All medications, products or food will be brought to your vehicle.

 

Equine In-Clinic Visits

What to expect:

When you arrive, please stay in your vehicle and call the clinic at (406) 446-2815. We will come out and bring your horse to the exam room. Dr. Casey will discuss the exam findings and treatment options by phone. When we are done, we will bring your horse back to your trailer. We can collect carside/curbside payment at that time or take payment over the phone. We will bring all prescription medications or products to your vehicle.

 

Medication Refills, Food or other Products

One our team members will bring your products out to your vehicle when you arrive, to limit the number of people entering the hospital. Please call ahead to give us time to get your products ready, and also when you arrive.

These are uncertain times for all of us, and we ask for your patience and understanding as new information is continuously reported and new protocols are established.

As always, it is our priority to keep your animals healthy. Now, we are doing our part to make sure you stay healthy too!

If you have any questions, please give us a call at (406) 446-2815 and we will address any concerns you may have.

Red Lodge Veterinary Clinic

CURBSIDE SERVICE ONLY

Coronavirus Update – RLVC Protocol

We are OPEN and providing our same level of service

We understand the concern in our community due to the outbreak of Coronavirus (COVID-19). We want you to know that we are taking the risk seriously. Most important, we hope you, your family and your pets are staying healthy during this challenging time.

We are writing to let you to know the steps we are taking to continue to provide quality care for your pets, while keeping you and our team safe.

In addition to our regular cleaning and disinfecting protocols, we have also increased the frequency of disinfecting high traffic areas, such as, reception counter tops, door knobs, exam room seating, tables, credit card machines and bathrooms. We are following the CDC recommendations to keep our team and clients healthy.

We have extra hand sanitizer in all areas of our hospital that we request you use on arrival and on your way out. We support our team and ask they stay home if they are not feeling well.

If you are showing symptoms of or test positive for COVID-19

If you are showing symptoms or test positive for COVID-19, have traveled to a high-risk area in the last 14 days, have been in contact with someone who has been showing symptoms or tested positive for COVID-19. We request to reschedule non-urgent medical care for your pet(s). If your pet requires a visit, or we cannot reschedule for medical reasons, we ask that you have a healthy friend of family member bring your pet in.

If you are not unwell, but are concerned about exposure

Please call the clinic when you arrive and we can come out to your vehicle and bring your pet in. We will discuss the exam findings by phone and proceed with treatment as requested.

For all others bringing their pet(s) in we ask that you follow these recommendations to reduce potential exposure:

  • Limit the number of people bringing your pet into the clinic for care.
  • Stay 3-5 feet away from others while waiting in reception. If preferred, after you check in, you may wait in your vehicle and we can call you when we are ready for you to come in.
  • Use hand sanitizer in exam rooms, bathrooms, and reception.

Equine and Large Animal Appointments

Follow the same protocols as listed above. If you are concerned about exposure, call us when you arrive and we will come out and meet you at your truck/trailer.

After-Hour Emergencies

Dr. Gruber will still be providing emergency care after-hours and on weekends. If you have been symptomatic, or directly exposed to COVID-19, we ask that you have a healthy friend or family member bring the patient in for care. if this is not possible, make sure that Dr. Gruber is aware of your situation, and we will do our best to help your pet(s) while reducing exposure to our doctor and staff.

We can bring medications and food out to your vehicle.

We carry many medications and pet food in-clinic. If you are concerned about exposure, you can pay over the phone and one our team members can bring your products out to your vehicle when you arrive. Please call ahead to give us time to get your products ready, and also when you get here.

We offer Home Delivery

Please use our online store to order medications, over-the-counter products, pet food and more Delivered directly to your door! Click the link below to get started.

VETSOURCE ONLINE PHARMACY – HOME DELIVERY

How is COVID-19 affecting pets?

The latest information does not show evidence of any risk to pets in contracting COVID-19 or being able to transmit the disease to humans.

What if my pet is coughing, sneezing or showing other COVID-19 symptoms?

As with any virus, we ask that your pet stay in the vehicle until we are ready to see them. Please check-in with reception and we will ensure that your pet does not have contact with other pets. Dogs and cats can contract other illnesses that produce the same symptoms, such as Bordetella Bronchispetica (kennel Cough), Canine Influenza, Feline Herpesvirus etc.

We are doing everything we can to continue to provide service to the community while following recommended guidelines to prevent transmission of COVID-19. We are monitoring the situation closely and will provide updates if changes to our protocol is necessary.

Please contact us with any questions or concerns. 406-446-2815 or redlodgevet@gmail.com

Please follow these links for updates:

CDC UPDATES

WHO UPDATES

WASAVA UPDATE

AVMA UPDATE FOR PET OWNERS

 

 

POSTPONED – SAVE THE DATE – Equine Educational Seminar 2020 – April 15th

 

** THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED ** We hope to reschedule at a later time this year. Please check back!

Red Lodge Veterinary Clinic is proud to host our 3rd annual Equine Educational Seminar. Thanks to the help from our sponsors MWI Animal Health and Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica we are once again able to offer this informative event at no charge to you! The location of the event is the Bull N’ Bear event room (upstairs) on Wednesday, April 15th. Doors open at 5:30pm, talks start at 6:00 pm and will go until 9:00pm. Food and drinks will be provided.

We are passionate about educating horse owners and enthusiasts on some common and not so common areas of interest. In the past we have touched on topics such as PPID (Cushings Disease), laminitis, lameness, vaccinations and infectious diseases. Stay tuned for this year’s topics! Follow our event on Facebook for updates! 3rd Annual Equine Seminar – FB Event

Please RSVP by April 5th. 406-446-2815 or email us at redlodgevet@gmail.com. The previous events have ‘sold-out’ and we had a wait list. So RSVP early to ensure a seat! We look forward to seeing everyone on April 15th. 

Save The Date!

 

Vetsource Online Pharmacy

We understand how important home delivery and online shopping is, which is why we’ve partnered with Vetsource, the industry-leading Home Delivery pharmacy provider to offer you this convenient service. 
 
Our partnership with Vetsource means that we can continue to supply you with quality products sourced directly from the manufacturer and have them shipped right to your front door with no shipping charges.* 

Ordering is easy! Click HERE to check out our online pharmacy.
 
Utilizing our online pharmacy is beneficial to both you and us as:
 
– Time saving: We can approve prescription requests faster and keep better track of our pets medications with our Vetsource online dashboard. Allowing your pets prescriptions to get on their way sooner!
 
  – Convenient: We can approve multiple refills with Vetsource which means you to set up auto-ship, so your pets medications and pet food arrives before you even think about it!  
 
– Quality and reputation: Vetsource is a reputable pharmacy that backs all of their products. They have a licensed pharmacist on staff AND double check all of the prescriptions before they leave the distribution center! Check out this FDA report on choosing a reputable pharmacy: FDA Document Re: Online Pharmacies
 
– You are supporting a LOCAL BUSINESS. By using our online pharmacy, you are helping us stay in business and continue to provide high-quality valuable services to the Red Lodge and surrounding areas. 
 
 Save Money! Each week receive special coupon codes for additional 10-25% off your order!
 
Click here HERE to get started today!  
You can also order over the phone! Call our office at 406-446-2815 or the Vetsource Pet Owner Care team at (877) 738-4443 Monday through Friday from 5 a.m. to 5 p.m. Pacific Time.

*Free standard shipping applies to all AutoShip, RemindMe and food orders, and all orders over $49.

 
Your pets health is our utmost priority, and helping you find easier more convenient ways to accomplish that is our mission!
 
Please contact us with any questions or concerns 406-446-2815.
 

Dental Month – February 2020

Equine Dental 2020

In February we will once again be offering a 20% discount on equine dental floats. In-clinic appointments only. Call us today 446-2815 to reserve your spot.

EQUINE DENTAL HEALTH:

Horses with dental problems may show obvious signs, such as pain or irritation, or they may show no noticeable signs at all. This is because some horses simply adapt to their discomfort.

For this reason, periodic dental examinations performed by your equine veterinarian are essential to your horse’s health. It is important to catch dental problems early. If a horse starts behaving abnormally, dental problems should be considered as a potential cause. Waiting too long may increase the difficulty of remedying certain conditions or may even make remedy impossible.

Look for the following indicators of dental problems from the American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) to know when to seek veterinary attention for your horse:

 

  1. Loss of feed from mouth while eating, difficulty with chewing, or excessive salivation.
  2. Loss of body condition.
  3. Large or undigested feed particles (long stems or whole grain) in manure.
  4. Head tilting or tossing, bit chewing, tongue lolling, fighting the bit, or resisting bridling.
  5. Poor performance, such as lugging on the bridle, failing to turn or stop, even bucking.
  6. Foul odor from mouth or nostrils, or traces of blood from the mouth.
  7. Nasal discharge or swelling of the face, jaw or mouth tissues.

 

Oral exams should be an essential part of an annual physical examination by your veterinarian. Every dental exam provides the opportunity to perform routine preventative dental maintenance. Mature horses should get a thorough dental exam at least once a year, and horses 2 –5 years old should be examined twice yearly.

 

Learn more about proper dental care at www.aaep.org/horse-owner

 

CANINE and FELINE DENTAL HEALTH:

The cause of gum disease is the same in cats and dogs as it is in people. Gum disease is an infection resulting from build-up of soft dental plaque on the surfaces of the teeth around the gums. The bacteria in dental plaque irritate the gum tissue if plaque is allowed to accumulate, which often leads to infection in the bone surrounding the teeth. Hard dental tartar (calculus) consists of calcium salts from saliva deposited on plaque. Tartar starts to form within a few days on a tooth surface that is not kept clean, and provides a rough surface that enhances further plaque accumulation. Once it has begun to grow in thickness, tartar is difficult to remove without dental instruments. – From VOHC.

Once tartar forms on the teeth, mechanical removal with an ultrasonic scaler and hand instruments followed by high frequency polishing is required to return the teeth to a health state. Annual or bi-annual prohylactic cleaning is recommended to prevent the advancement of periodontal disease. 

Contact us today to learn more! 446-2815

Q & A Swelling in the Girth Area

Article by Dr. Casey Gruber – Originally posted on thehorse.com

Question:

My horse is swollen under his girth area on both sides of his body. There isn’t a sore; the area just seems very tender when I groom it. The girth does not seem to be rubbing. What could be causing this problem?

Answer:

This is not an uncommon finding you are describing with your horse but one that can be a bit tricky to figure out.

Though you mentioned it does not appear to be the result of rubbing, I would check your tack closely to make sure that excess pressure in the cinch or girth is not occurring at the swelling site.

If you ride in a western saddle, the length of the cinch can sometimes create pressure at the “D” ring where the latigo attaches to. Even an otherwise properly fit saddle can create “hot spots” or pressure sores in the girth region related to the contact site with the cinch.

These scenarios are less likely to occur with an English saddle, but still worth a closer inspection.

I have also seen horses develop allergic reactions (contact dermatitis) to a cinch based on their makeup (cotton, neoprene, etc.).

During this time of year, a horse’s longer coat can trap in moisture underneath tack leading to higher incidence of skin reactions or dermatitis. Sometimes an obvious rash is not always present. Even irritation from tack pulling on the coat can lead to inflammation and irritation of the area. This will hopefully improve within a week or two if the horse is not saddled during this time.

It is also recommended that you contact your local veterinarian to get his or her advice. A bacteria or fungal infection is possible in that location (including ringworm) and treatment will depend on many variables, including the horse’s general health, age, and geographic location. Please have your veterinarian examine the horse if you continue to have concerns.

FAQs – Equine Vaccines

Q: I just purchased a five year old horse with unknown vaccination history, what does she need?

A: Vaccinations for horses are split into 2 groups: core and risk-based vaccines. The type and number of vaccines needed will be determined by the horses age, health status, anticipated use and management practices. Horses that either have never been vaccinated or their vaccine history is unknown should receive the initial priming vaccine followed by a booster in 28 days before they go on an annual vaccination to schedule. This schedule maximizes the efficacy of the vaccine and strengthens the horse’s immune system.

Q: My horse travels to shows in and outside of the state, are there any other vaccines I should be giving?

A: Vaccination against contagious diseases such as influenza, equine herpes virus (rhinopneumonitis) and strangles should be considered for horses traveling, boarding at horse barns, show horses and for horses managed at other at high-risk areas. Risk of disease may vary throughout the year or based on the horse’s health status. Contact our office at 406-446-2815 to set up a customized vaccination program for your horse

Q: My mare just foaled out, when does the foal need its first vaccines?

A: The answer depends on if your mare was fully vaccinated before and during pregnancy. Typically your foal will not need a vaccine until 4-6 months of age. 

Q: I have a stallion and a mare that I would like to start breeding, what shots do they need and when?

A: If you plan on using your horses for breeding, please contact the clinic at 406-446-2815 so that we can discuss a vaccination program specific to your horse.

Q: Can I administer vaccines to my horse myself or does a veterinarian need to do it?

A: The Rabies vaccine is the only vaccine that state and federal laws require a veterinarian must give. All other vaccines can be administered by non-veterinarians. However, administering vaccinations incorrectly may create health problems or limit the effectiveness of the vaccine. Additionally, many of the pharmaceutical companies the produce vaccines provide assurance guarantee programs for their vaccines if administered by a licensed veterinarian. This means that if a reaction or side-effect occurred from the vaccine and it was administered by a veterinarian, the pharmaceutical company would help support the owner financially in seeking medical attention for their horse.

Please contact Dr. Casey Gruber at 406-446-2815 for a personalized vaccination program for your horse. 

FAQs – Feline Vaccines

Q: I have a barn cat, what vaccines does she need?

A: The core feline vaccines regardless of lifestyle are: Viral Rhinotracheitis (Herpesvirus type 1), Calcivirus, Panleukopenia and Rabies. If your cat is 8 weeks or younger, we recommend the FVRCP combo at 8, 12 and 16 weeks. If your cat is over the age of 16 weeks and has not been vaccinated before, she will need the FVRCP combo vaccine, then re-vaccinated in 3-4 weeks, the FVRCP vaccine is boosted one year after the initial series then every 3 years. The Rabies vaccine can be given as young as 12 weeks, the first Rabies vaccine will be boosted in one year, then every three years.

Q: My indoor/outdoor cat has contact with a lot of other cats, are there any other vaccines I should think about?

A: If she is in contact with a lot of other cats with unknown vaccine history, we recommend vaccinating for Feline Leukemia. The vaccine is administered at 12 weeks of age, boosted in 3-4 weeks then re-vaccinated annually. Before administration of the first vaccine it is recommended to test your cat for Feline Leukemia / Feline Immunodeficiency Virus. This is a quick blood test ran in-house. The reason we test first, is to ensure that your cat has not been exposed to the virus. If she has, the vaccine will not be effective. If your cat tests positive for FeLeuk  or FIV, Dr. Gruber will discuss the options you have to manage the disease. 

Q: My breeder gave the first vaccine at 5 weeks of age, how may more does my kitten need?

A: Any vaccination administered before 6 weeks of age will not be counted towards the initial series, as the maternal antibodies present from your kittens mom will prevent proper immunity to be acquired from that vaccine. She will still need three vaccines, administered 3-4 weeks apart with the final one at at least 16 weeks. 

Q: What exactly is Feline Herpesvirus, Panleukopenia, Calicivirus and Rabies? And why do I need to vaccinate my cat?

Rhinotracheitis (Feline Herpes) FHV

FHV is a herpesvirus that causes the symptoms of sneezing, runny eyes and nose. Because herpes viruses do not go away, chronic infections are the rule.

 Transmission

Airborne exposure from coughing or sneezing cats. Contact with infected salivary and respiratory secretions from food or water bowls and equipment.

Symptoms

Runny eyes, nose and sneezing.

FHV may cause permanent damage to nasal sinuses causing long-term sneezing problems or runny nose. FHV may also cause ulcers in the eyes called dendritic ulcers, which are usually seen in animals that are chronically infected.

Panleukopenia (Feline Distemper)

Feline Panleukopenia is related to the Parvovirus of puppies. It causes young kittens born to non-vaccinated mothers to have brain damage.

Transmission

By contact with infected diarrhea, the virus can remain active on inanimate objects for months.

Symptoms

Vomiting, bloody diarrhea, fever, severe anemia, anorexia and lethargy. Older infected kittens will have diarrhea associated with severe immunosuppression.  The most severe effect is that it destroys all the white blood cells which prevent the kitten from being able to fight off any disease.  Very few kittens survive this disease.

Calicivirus

Feline calicivirus is a virus that may cause the same signs as FHV but usually affects the eyes and lungs more. It causes ulcers on the mouth and tongue.  The first sign may be excessive salivation and reluctance to eat.  This is followed within 24 hours by ulceration of the tongue that may cause the whole tongue to slough. 

Transmission

Through airborne contact with infected saliva, or droplets from sneezing. Along with contact from eye or nasal discharge and occasionally feces.

Symptoms

The first sign may be excessive salivation and reluctance to eat.  This is followed within 24 hours by ulceration of the tongue that may cause the whole tongue to slough. Severe pneumonia may also be present.  High fever is common.  The cats will be very dehydrated with a painful and odorous mouth. Calicivirus may cause pneumonia that leads to death if not treated aggressively.

Rabies

Rabies is an acute progressive viral encephalomyelitis that is fatal once clinical signs appear. It affects animals and humans.

Transmission

Through contact with infected saliva usually through a bite wound. Infected animals can shed the virus up to 8 days before clinical signs appear, which is why there is a 10 day waiting period before euthanizing an acutely aggressive dog or cat. The virus travels from the bite wounds via the peripheral nerves to the brain and then infects that salivary glands.

Symptoms

 There are two different forms of Rabies – the ‘Furious Form’ and the ‘Paralytic Form’.

Furious Form – the animal becomes alert and irritable, loud sounds may invite a vicious attack, the animal may attack people other animals or any moving object. The pupils are usually dilated. As the disease progresses ataxia (muscle incoordination), and seizures occur and the animal will die of progressive paralysis.

Paralytic Form – causes ataxia, paralysis of the jaw muscles and throat resulting in excessive drooling and occasionally drooping jaw. The animals with this form may not be vicious and rarely bite. The paralysis progresses rapidly and results in coma and death within a few hours.

Feline Leukemia Virus

A virus that suppresses the immune system causing predisposition to deadly infections. Typically causes anemia and lymphoma. Cats can be carriers and transmit the disease, even if they appear healthy.

Transmission

Saliva, blood and occasionally urine and feces.

Symptoms

Symptoms include pale gums, jaundice, lethargy, anorexia, weight loss, upper respiratory infections, urinary tract infections, enlarged lymph nodes and difficulty breathing. 85% of cats with persistent infection will pass away from complications within the first three years after diagnosis.

Please call 406-446-2815 for more information and to schedule your cat today!

FAQs – Puppy Vaccines

Q: I just got a new puppy  what shots does he need?

A: The CORE vaccinations that your puppy needs are: Distemper, Adenovirus Type 2 (Hepatitis), Parainfluenza and Parvovirus combo vaccine. We recommend giving the combo vaccine at 8, 12 and 16 weeks. If your puppy is more than 16 weeks (4 months) he needs just two vaccines given 3-4 weeks apart. The Rabies vaccine is administered at 16 weeks of age. The first Rabies vaccine does not need to be boosted until 1 year later. After the one year booster of the initial series the DA2PPv and Rabies are only needed every three years. 

Q: My breeder administered his first shot at 5 weeks, how many more do we need?

A: Any vaccination administered before 6 weeks of age will not be counted towards the initial series, as the maternal antibodies present from your pups mom will prevent proper immunity to be acquired from that vaccine. He will still need three vaccines, administered 3-4 weeks apart with the final one at at least 16 weeks. 

Q: When can I socialize my puppy at the dog park?

A: We recommend waiting until 2 weeks after the initial series is completed before introducing him to other dogs with unknown vaccine history. 

Q: I am worried about vaccine reactions, what should I watch for?

A: Although vaccination reactions are rare, we do advise to watch for swelling or tenderness at the injection site, lethargy, vomiting and diarrhea. Most reactions are self-limiting (meaning no medical intervention is necessary), but if you do see any reaction, please call the clinic 406-446-2815,  so that we can be made aware and make recommendations regarding your puppies future vaccination visits. 

Q: My puppy has been unwell, has a fever and diarrhea, can we still vaccinate today?

A: If your puppy is sick at the time of the vaccination visit, we will likely recommend waiting until he is healthier in order to make sure that the vaccination provides the best protection. If his immune system is compromised when we vaccinate, he will not generate the proper antibodies to fight the diseases we are trying to protect him from.

Q: What exactly is distemper, parvovirus, adenovirus and parainfluenza? And why do I need to vaccinate for them?

A: The diseases and viruses that we protect against can be life threatening. The vaccinations are safe, inexpensive and readily available.

Distemper (CDV)

Canine distemper is a serious and contagious disease caused by a virus that attacks the respiratory, gastrointestinal and nervous systems of puppies and dogs.

Transmission

Airborne exposure from coughing or sneezing dogs. Contact with infected salivary and respiratory secretions from food or water bowls and equipment.

Symptoms

Infected dogs will exhibit clear watery to thick pus-like discharge from their eyes. Next they will develop fever, nasal discharge, coughing, lethargy, reduced appetite, and vomiting. Once the virus attacks the nervous system, infected dogs develop circling behavior, head tilt, muscle twitches, convulsions with jaw chewing movements and salivation (“chewing gum fits”), seizures, and partial or complete paralysis. Distemper is often fatal, and dogs that survive usually have permanent, irreparable nervous system damage.

Parvovirus 

Parvovirus is a highly contagious virus that effects the gastrointestinal tract and rapidly dividing cells of dogs.

Transmission

By contact with infected diarrhea, the virus can remain active on inanimate objects for months.

Symptoms

Vomiting, bloody diarrhea and abdominal pain, low body temperature (hypothermia), loss of appetite and lethargy. Persistent vomiting and diarrhea cause a rapid onset of dehydration which can result in death within 48 hours of first symptoms if not treated immediately.

Adenovirus Type 1 and 2 (CAV-1 & CAV-2)

Canine adenovirus type 1 is infectious canine hepatitis, which is a viral infection of the liver. Canine adenovirus type-2 is one of the causes of infectious tracheobronchitis, also known as canine cough. CAV-2 is related to the hepatitis virus, canine adenovirus type 1 (CAV-1). It is the CAV-2 strain that we use in vaccines and it protects against CAV-1 as well.

Transmission

Through contact with blood, urine, feces, and salivary or respiratory secretions of infected animals.

Symptoms

CAV-1 results in vomiting, diarrhea, fever and abdominal pain; as well as clotting disorders, and corneal edema. CAV-2 causes a hacking cough, retching, coughing up white foamy discharge and conjunctivitis.

Canine Parainfluenza Virus

Canine Parainfluenza Virus is a highly contagious respiratory. CPIV is one of the most common pathogens that causes infectious tracheobronchitis or canine cough

Transmission

Airborne exposure from coughing or sneezing dogs. Contact with infected salivary and respiratory secretions from food or water bowls and equipment.

Symptoms

Include, dry or moist cough, low grade fever, loss of appetite, lethargy and nasal discharge.

Rabies

Rabies is an acute progressive viral encephalomyelitis that is fatal once clinical signs appear. It affects animals and humans.

Transmission

Through contact with infected saliva usually through a bite wound. Infected animals can shed the virus up to 8 days before clinical signs appear, which is why there is a 10 day waiting period before euthanizing an acutely aggressive dog or cat. The virus travels from the bite wounds via the peripheral nerves to the brain and then infects that salivary glands.

Symptoms

Furious Form – the animal becomes alert and irritable, loud sounds may invite a vicious attack, the animal may attack people other animals or any moving object. The pupils are usually dilated. As the disease progresses ataxia (muscle in-coordination), and seizures occur and the animal will die of progressive paralysis. There are two different forms of Rabies – the ‘Furious Form’ and the ‘Paralytic Form’.

Paralytic Form – causes ataxia, paralysis of the jaw muscles and throat resulting in excessive drooling and occasionally drooping jaw. The animals with this form may not be vicious and rarely bite. The paralysis progresses rapidly and results in coma and death within a few hours.

 

Non-core vaccines are recommended depending on you puppies lifestyle.

Bordetella Bronchiseptica

Recommended if your dog will be attending puppy classes, doggy daycare, boarding facilities or shows.

Given at 12 weeks of age – orally, boosted annually.

Canine infectious tracheobronchitis, also referred to as canine cough is a highly contagious respiratory disease that affects dogs. It causes inflammation of the trachea and bronchi.

Transmission

Though contact with infected salivary or respiratory secretions. At risk pets are those that stay in boarding facilities, or go to dog shows, dog parks or live in multi-pet households.

Symptoms

Include dry hacking cough, retching and sneezing, watery nasal discharge and in severe cases pneumonia, loss of appetite, fever and lethargy.

Canine Influenza H3N8/H3N2

http://www.dogflu.com

Recommended if your dog will be attending puppy classes, doggy daycare, boarding facilities or shows.

Canine Influenza is also known as ‘Canine Flu’ and is a contagious respiratory disease caused by a virus.

Transmission

It is spread by contact with infected saliva or respiratory secretions. The infectious secretions can stay active for a period of time on clothing or other items

Symptoms

Coughing, runny nose, and fever. Not all infected dogs will show signs of illness. The severity of illness can range from no symptoms to severe pneumonia and rarely death

Leptospirosis

http://www.stoplepto.com

Recommended for all dogs, regardless of lifestyle. We include the Leptospirosis 4 way  in all of our DA2PPv combo vaccinations. 

Same schedule as the DA2PPv vaccine.

Leptospirosis is a disease caused by infection from Leptospira bacteria. Leptospirosis can cause kidney failure, liver failure, and severe lung disease.

Transmission

This bacteria is found in water and soil around the world and can affect pets and humans. Dogs can become infected by coming in contact with infected urine, soil, water or carcasses of other infected animals.

Symptoms

include fever, muscle tenderness, shivering, reluctance to move, increased thirst, dehydration, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, lethargy, jaundice (yellowing of the skin and mucous membranes), or painful inflammation within the eyes. It can also cause some bleeding disorders which can cause nosebleeds, petechia (pin-point red spots on gums or light-colored skin), as well as blood-tinged vomit, urine, stool or saliva.

Crotalus Atrox (Western Diamondback Rattlesnake) 

Recommended for dogs that hike in the back country in rattlesnake areas. We have seen rattlesnakes around Cooney reservoir.

Intended for prophylactic use in healthy dogs. Aids in the reduction of morbidity and mortality due to intoxication with Crotalus atrox (Western diamondback rattlesnake) toxin. The vaccine is cross-protective against the venom of several other types of rattlesnakes found in California.

This vaccine should be given in the spring time as it is most effective in the first 4 months after vaccination.

Given no younger than 16 weeks, boosted in 3-4 weeks then annually.    

Transmission

A bite from a Western Diamondback Rattlesnake can transmit the toxin Crotalus Atrox to your dog.

Symptoms

Include bleeding puncture wounds, difficulty breathing, lethargy, whimpering in pain, hiding, slow or labored breathing and tissue necrosis. The vaccine does NOT prevent your pet from needing emergency treatment, it only slows the progression of the venom in the body to allow you more time.

We carry antivenom in our practice in case of an emergency.

 

Please call the clinic 406-446-2815 to schedule an appointment and discuss our PUPPY PACKAGES!